Chicago Stock Exchange and other Chinese investments

 •  Filed under China, International economics

Judging by the recent money flows, Chinese companies like offshore wind farms, European football clubs, and... financial infrastructure:

Bloomberg Business: Obscure Chinese Firm Dives Into $22 Trillion U.S. Market

While the world has gotten used to seeing Chinese companies snap up overseas businesses, the purchase of a 134-year-old U.S. stock market by Chongqing Casin Enterprise Group -- a little-known property and investment firm from southwestern China -- raises a whole host of questions. For starters, why does a provincial Chinese business with no apparent ties to the securities industry have any interest in buying one of America’s smallest equity exchanges? And will U.S. regulators sign off?

Bloomberg: Beijing Enterprises to Buy EEW as China Increases Takeovers

Chinadaily.com.cn: "Foreign investment in manufacturing in China barely increased last year, but that in hi-tech manufacturing rose 9.5 percent year on year, accounting for 23.8 percent of the total, official data showed."

Reuters: China promises economic stability as G20, parliament loom

The NDRC plans to allocate 400 billion yuan ($61.3 billion) to fund local governments' infrastructure projects, a local branch of the economic planner said in a statement before the long Lunar New Year break.

The economic planner said on Wednesday that it had okayed 54.1 billion yuan of investments in January - following approval of 2.52 trillion yuan worth of projects in 2015 - to help support growth. Monkey Cage: China pledged to invest $60 billion in Africa. Here’s what that means.

A love for soccer

RTS: "Les sponsors chinois investissent massivement dans le football européen. Après les Qataris, les sponsors chinois multiplient les contrats avec des clubs européens de football. Aucun des grands championnats ne semble devoir y échapper désormais."

CFIUS on managers' minds?

FT: “China's appetite for US assets was stifled on Tuesday after Fairchild Semiconductor turned down a $2.6bn bid from Chinese state-backed enterprises over fears that the deal would be blocked by US regulators.”